Sick Goldfish

Being the good parent that you are, you have probably studied and memorized the normal movements and behaviors of your goldfish. If Goldie happens to become ill, look for signs that differ for their normal swimming patterns.

If your fish is shaking, hiding in corners and isolated places, gasping for breath near the surface of the tank, has his fins pressed together in a clamped fashion or demonstrates any other strange behaviors, it might be a good indicator that he’s coming down with an illness. Once you’ve noticed these odd actions, take a closer look at your fish and see if there are discolorations or markings on his body.

Fish with certain parasites might have red and inflamed areas, sometimes around the gills, or might have swollen blood bumps on eir bodies. Check for damaged fins, cloudy eyes and bumps or blisters that appear on the scales.

There are many common goldfish ailments that can be identified by examining your pet’s physical appearance. Once you have identified that there is definitely something wrong with your fish, it is a good idea to isolate him from your other fish in a hospital tank.

The hospital tank is prepared in advance and made to match the current environment of your fish, so that he won’t go into shock. If the ailment turns out to be contagious, it’s not a bad idea to treat your other fish as well as the sick one.

Unfortunately, some fish, no matter how hard you try, do not overcome their illness and continue to suffer until they pass away. Many people do not like to see their fish in constant pain and fell that euthanasia is appropriate. There are many methods out there for ending the life of a goldfish, so be sure to choose one that does not cause your fish even more pain.

Keeping The Aquarium Clean for Goldfish

You will need to use a siphon to clean your goldfish tank because it efficiently cleans up the muck, does not disturb your fish and is easy to use. It’s essential to use during the partial water changes. A typical aquarium gravel vacuum would be a wide tube attached to a narrower siphon tube. By cleaning the gravel every week you would get rid of a lot of substances that could turn toxic for your fish over a period of time. Here’s how you begin the siphoning process:

  • Put a bucket on a low stool or even on the floor in front of the fish tank, and place the wide end of the gravel vacuum in the tank.
  • Now gently suck at the other end and hold it over the bucket. Once you feel the water flowing into the tube let it flow into the bucket. Be careful not to swallow the water though- but even if you do, it isn’t going to be harmful!
  • Now that the siphon has started, use the wider end to suck out the dirt and debris out of the gravel and flow out of the tank into the bucket.
  • Pass the vacuum end over all the gravel and keep doing so till you have removed 10 to 15% of the water.
  • If gravel gets stuck in the vacuum, release the gravel by plugging the other end of the siphon tube with your finger or thumb.
  • When you want to stop the siphon just raise both ends above the level of the tank
  • To stop the siphon, simply raise either end of the siphon above the surface level of the fish tank.

There are gravel vacuum that can be attached to a faucet but this would mean that you be putting back tap water directly into the tank which might not be good for your goldfish if there is a marked temperature difference. Also you would be adding all the chemicals present in the tap water without allowing the chlorine to evaporate. The best option is to keep a container of fresh water overnight.

The Weekly 10-15%

Cleaning your tank is essential to your goldfish’s well being. In fact, both your plants and your goldfish need fresh, clean and healthy water to survive. All you need to do is set aside a little time every week to do what is called a Partial Water Change or 10-15% Water Change.
This weekly routine will not only keep your aquarium look nice and clean, it will keep your goldfish healthy. Partial water changes are no sweat – all you have to do is scrape the algae, vacuum the gravel and replace the water you remove with fresh water. Here’s what you need to do:

  • Remove the algae on the surface of the tank with an algae scraper before you siphon out the water.
  • As the name suggests you need to remove 10 to 15% of the water from your aquarium.
  • There is no need to remove your fish to a separate container.
  • As you remove the water use the siphon to remove the messy deposits in the gravel.
  • In case you have an under gravel filter, then you would have to clean the gravel during weekly water changes.
  • Do not take out all the ornaments and decorations and scrub them clean because you might destroy some of the much-needed beneficial bacteria that act as natural biological filter.
  • You can clean the filters during the weekly water change but do not change all the cartridges, sponges, carbon packets, etc., as this might remove all the good bacteria and harm your goldfish in the long run.
  • Also remember to rinse any new filter media in cool running water before introducing it to the system.
  • Once you have siphoned out 10-15% of the water and most of the dirt and the alga, it’s time to replace the amount of water you removed with fresh, dechlorinated tap water which has been left at room temperature over night, in container free of soap residue.
  • Use a siphon to transfer the fresh water into the tank as this would be a gentle way to put the water back in and it won’t disturb the plants and the gravel. You would also spill a lot less!
  • Do make sure that the fresh water is of somewhat the same temperature as the water in the tank. You cannot just dunk in cold water because Goldfish are not tropical fish.
    Do remember to leave enough space between the top of the water and the tank hood so that your goldfish get enough oxygen to breathe in.

What not to do

  • If you see that the level in your aquarium has gone down, do not simply add water to make it level again. This is harmful, as you are not getting rid of the impurities in the water. You are just adding water without removing the dirt and thus making the water harder and more difficult for the goldfish to live in. So don’t add water to top off the tank, do a partial water change.
  • Never add water directly from the tap. Please keep a separate container only for aquarium use and leave the water overnight so that the harmful chemicals and chlorine evaporate.
  • Please do not skip weekly water changes because if you do not partially change the water, you are allowing the build up of waste products like Nitrate that are not removed by the filter, and contribute to the growth of algae.

Choosing The Right Goldfish

  • Choose the right pet shop. Ask people you know who are committed fish keepers for reputed goldfish dealers. These are the people who care and would have professional knowledge of breeding and nurturing goldfish. See if they give a proper fish guarantee. When you enter the shop, look around at all the tanks. Make sure that the tanks are not overcrowded with fish. See if all kinds of fish are thrown together in one tank or care is taken to separate the various species. Look out for dead floating fish. The dead fish could have spread an infection to the other fish.
  • Question the Goldfish Dealer. If the dealer claims that the goldfish are imported, then find out which country they are from and when they arrived. Ask him or her is the correct quarantine procedures have been adopted before putting up the goldfish for sale. If they were bred, find out when they were bred and how the fish have been kept till now as in what kind of medications if any has been used and for how long. Find out if the dealer has used salt in the water.
  • Observe how the fish swims. This is a good gauge to identify healthy fish. A fish should be active, swimming with ease and style and poking around curiously at nooks and corners. Choose a goldfish that looks active and doesn’t wobble or tilt to one side or just rest at the bottom. Tap the tank and see how the goldfish reacts. A fish that is slow in its reaction might be a sick one. Make sure that it’s not opening its mouth too much for air, as it might be an indication of problems with the gills.
  • Check out the fins. Make sure that the dorsal fin is straight and stands up. The backs of the goldfish should be smooth, without unsightly bumps. Also check that all the fins are healthy, even and are not rotted away or damaged. In all, a Goldfish should have a dorsal fin (unless it is a goldfish without a dorsal fin), pectoral fins that extend out on sides, two anal fins or one right in the middle. Beware a goldfish with just one anal fin that’s placed kind of off to one side. It could mean that the other anal fin is growing inwards and that could be fatal to the goldfish.
  • Inspect the looks. Make sure that you give the goldfish you are choosing a thorough look over. See that the fish has a nice symmetrical shape and make sure they don’t have large heads compared to their body. It would do good to feel the fish to check if the skin is too slimy or too dry but at least ensure that the skin is free of spots and odd bumps and that the gills are red. There should be no redness in the anal region and definitely nothing sticking out or leaking out. The outside of the mouth should be free from redness and white strings and the eyes free from white flecks.
  • Bag ’em right. Where you’re buying goldfish, you will have to put them in the ubiquitous plastic bag, but do so with care. Make sure that the dealer leaves enough space on top for the oxygen and the right amount of water. The right amount of the water is that which covers the fish. Do not allow the dealer to add

Info of Goldfish Analysis

Goldfish sure are smart not in the sense as dogs are, but they are smart. They will swim up to meet you probably because they think you are going to feed them. They might not be able to differentiate between one person and the other but they do know that the people they live with are the caregivers. Know that they depend on you and hence love you.

Why is a new goldfish not moving in its bowl, when he is very much alive?
Well first of all, he probably hates being in a bowl. Goldfish do not like bowls even though humans think the bowls are cute. Put him in a tank with a compatible companion goldfish. Meanwhile watch the fish. Is he coming up to the top of the tank when you feed him? If he is then, he’s probably just getting used to the new bowl. If it looks like he has difficulty swimming and that he keeps sinking to the bottom he might have a swim bladder disorder caused by too much dry food and bad water.

Why is a goldfish swimming to the top every once in a while?
Goldfish keep swimming to the surface of the tank because that’s where they get their oxygen. Always make sure that there is enough empty space at the top. Do not fill up the tank to the brim, as leaving space will give them the required oxygen. If your fish are normally active, swimming and chasing each other a round, don’t worry if they swim to the top every once in a while.

Why do goldfish always seem starving?

That’s because they are greedy! Don’t get tempted enough to feed them whenever they ask for it because overfeeding will cause them more harm. Besides, goldfish can never starve to death; they are always nibbling away at something or the other.

Why would one goldfish lie motionless most of the time whilst the rest swim around? Is it a social outcast?

If you have different varieties of goldfish, make sure they are compatible. The slower fancy varieties might get stressed out by the faster ones like comets. Yes, they might feel like outcasts and keep to themselves. Some goldfish might even get aggressive with another and in that case you need to one that is being badgered to another tank.

Why are all the goldfish so lifeless and tend to stay at the bottom of the tank most of the time, like they are very tired?

If they aren’t swimming as they usually do, something is definitely bothering them.

If you tank is brand new and the goldfish are having a problem because the tank has not been cycled. Wait a while and watch. Make sure you cycle the tank before you put them in because a new tank cannot deal with the ammonia that the goldfish produce.

If you tank is an old one and the goldfish are suddenly more still than usual it could be that the toxicity of the water is bothering them. So change the water. When your goldfish seem inactive, you must check the water for nitrites and the pH level.