Dog Boutiques

Dog Clothing from the Boutique

Every celebrity seems to have a well-dressed dog on his or her arms or by their side! One of the most popular choices of dog accessories from these boutiques is a collar, from diamond studded to bright red leather; every dog can find something that takes their (or their owners’) fancy. Whilst there are many off the shelf options, increasingly these doggie outlets are offering made to measure individual options for the discerning pet owner.

Dog coats are also becoming a must have for every dog’s wardrobe. A particularly popular choice is to have a coat that has your canine friend’s name embroidered on the side in a color that complements your choice of collar.

Dog Edibles from the Boutique

Not only is it important that your dog looks great but he also wants to feel great! Take a look in your local dog boutique for the latest tempting treats. A great range that is increasing in popularity is the organic biscuits and other treats. What better way to reward your dog and also to keep him fit?

Pet Pampering Days

As well as the many items that you can take away, a specialist dog shop may offer you a ‘spa’ day for your canine friend or even a health break! These breaks will offer your dog a series of holistic treatments such as massage as well as organic foods and detox.

Choose a Dog for Children

Find a dog that is good with children.

Don’t all dogs love children? The answer is simple – NO. Some breeds, and even individuals within a breed, are more or less tolerant of children and the rough handling that usually ensues. Selecting a breed that enjoys the rambunctious atmosphere of a family home will go far in ensuring that the children have a willing playmate and the dog is happy.

Choose a dog that is the right size or energy level.

Do you live in an apartment? Do you have a large, fenced yard? Considering the size of home or yard you have should influence your choice of dog. Some breeds are naturally larger than others. Some smaller breeds (like Jack Russell Terriers) are small but have an enormous amount of energy that can be difficult to control in a small home.

Decide on a trained or untrained dog.

Perhaps you plan to train the dog yourself. You may choose a puppy so the children participate in the training process. But how much do you know about training dogs? Are you ready for the hassles of housebreaking and obedience training? Perhaps selecting an older, trained dog might suit your family better.

Teaching Your Dog Self-Control

Teach Commands, Not Actions

When your dog lunges at something, instead of pulling tight on their leash to get them to stop, you should instead be telling them what to do in a firm voice. Tugging, even lightly on their leash only tells a dog who the master is, but not what behavior he should be exhibiting. Use this time constructively to practice commands that are appropriate in the situation, instead.

Treat Your Dog like a Friend

Realize that sometimes, your dog just won’t be able to do what you ask him to do, just like a good friend can’t sometimes as well. Dog training shouldn’t be about who is in charge, but instead about compromise and taking variables into account as required. So don’t ask your dog to sit still if he is truly excited about something – ask him instead to sit quietly.

Show Doggy How

Unless you show, or tell, your dog how to react, he won’t know how. Instead, he’ll do what he always does, which is pull and tug at his leash. Give him positive ways in which to respond to every tempting situation, and with some guidance he’ll be able to do what’s right.

Speak On His Terms

When you raise your voice or talk sharply, a dog hears this tone as being excited, similar to barking. It reinforces his already excited behavior, and gives him the idea that you are excited too, so it should be okay! Instead, use your dog training to speak softly and in quiet tones to get your dog to calm down, and he’ll realize soon enough it’s not appropriate behavior for the situation.

Hypoallergenic Dogs

It has been estimated that about 10% of the US population is allergic to animals (American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology). Symptoms of the reactions can range from watery eyes to dangerous asthma attacks.

The problem is not with the pet’s hair. It is the dander, or microscopic scales of dead skin (similar to, but much smaller than the dandruff on the human scalp) which pets are constantly shedding that is the cause. They are so tiny that you seldom know that they are circulating in the air or laying on the furniture and carpets because they are so small.

Here is a list of Hypoallergenic Dogs. If I have missed any I do apologize.

  • American Hairless Terrier
  • Basenji
  • Border Terrier
  • Cairn Terrier
  • Chinese Crested (hairless)
  • Havanese
  • Kerry Blue Terrier
  • Maltese
  • Miniature Schnauzer
  • Portuguese Water Dog
  • Shih-Tzu
  • Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
  • Spanish Water Dog
  • Standard Poodle
  • Standard Schnauzer
  • Tibetan Terrier
  • Toy Poodle
  • West Highland White Terrier
  • Wirehaired Fox Terrier
  • Yorkshire Terrier

Please remember that no dog is 100% hypoallergenic and also that allergic sufferers react differently to each separate breed of dog. For West Highland Terriers owners, such as myself, the news is good. They are considered good for allergy sufferers, with a relatively low dander (ranked number 7). However you need to be reminded that one person’s allergies may vary greatly from another person. It is always advisable to visit the home of the dog you wish to have, before you bring it home. I hope that you found this article of use to you

Good health and happiness

Common Dog Emergencies

Traffic Accident:

If possible, do not to move the dog. Call the nearest Humane Society or ASPCA office. If the animal workers can’t or won’t come and you must move the dog, slide a blanket under the animal. Lift the animal to safety with the help of another person. Check for a heartbeat and bleeding. Try to stop the excessive loss of blood by holding a clean cloth or pad over the wound and securing it tightly with a makeshift bandage. Take the dog to the nearest vet, calling ahead to prepare them for the emergency.

Burns:

1. Immerse the burned body part in cold running water for as long as possible. 2. If the burn is from a caustic substance, wash it off. 3. Call the vet.

Heat stroke

Warning signs: The dog is overheated and without sufficient air. The dog might be panting, vomiting, frothing at the mouth, or already collapsed. 1. Remove the froth, 2. Place or douse the dog with cold water to lower body temperature. 3. Take the dog immediately to the veterinarian for treatment. Treatment usually consists of more cold water, drugs and observation.

Dog Poisoning

Warning signs: Look for muscular twitching, vomiting, bleeding, convulsion or collapse. 1. Have someone call the vet. 2. Follow the vet’s advice. Different poisoning cases sometimes have to be treated differently. 3. If you cannot reach the vet, try to induce vomiting. Salt and mustard in water usually will do the trick. 4. If you know what the poison is, take some of it with you to the vet’s office.

Dog Choking

Open the dog’s mouth carefully and try to see what is causing the problem. It could be anything: a small ball, bone, stick, meat wrapping. Pump the chest by pressing down on the ribs and releasing immediately at 5-second intervals. If this doesn’t dislodge the object within a few moments, rush the dog to the nearest animal hospital to have the foreign object removed under anesthetic.

Drowning

Remove the dog from the water. Try to get the water out of the dog’s lungs as soon as possible by pumping the chest as for choking (see above). Take the dog to the vet to be checked out. Hopefully, you will never have to handle any of these emergencies. But if you do, you have the dog health advice that you need.

Buy A Purebred Dog

If you simply want a companion consider a mixed breed. There is nothing a mix breed puppy cannot offer you in terms of love, companionship and devotion, and there are many mixed breed dogs already born, looking for homes.

When you discover you are in love with a particular breed, do some research to find out if the breed is compatible with your lifestyle. Pay special attention to breed characteristics, size, hair length, and amount of exercise required.

Talk to breed rescue centers. They will tell you what to look out for. No one has more experience on the breed as the dedicated volunteers and professionals who rescue the purebred dogs when they are no longer wanted. Learn how a typical dog of your beloved breed behaves and whether that is a fit for your lifestyle and your entire family.

Keep in mind how much room your dog will have, how much exercise you are able to handle daily, grooming needs, and how much maintenance they will require. Your rescue organization will also give you the “dumping factor” what the most common reason is for this breed being abandoned by their families.

Make sure everyone in your family is committed to interacting with the dog daily – the quality of life for your dog is based on healthy and constant social interaction. If your family cannot provide huge amounts of time, and if your dog is going to be home alone during the day, consider getting two dogs so that they can keep one another company. No matter what the breed, two dogs are no more trouble than one.

Make sure that you can guarantee a lifetime of dedication to your new dog.

To locate a dog, check out the pounds online. As many as 25% of the dogs in pounds ARE purebreds, and surprisingly there ARE puppies. To find a dog in a pound in your neighborhood, you can go online at http://www.Muttshack.org, type in your area code and look at the photos of dogs in the shelters near your home.

Next try the special breed rescue centers. They frequently rescue purebreds from the pounds because of their love and devotion to the breed. They may give you truly valuable advice about your new dog. If they don’t have one, consider waiting. It won’t take long!

If you can’t find your purebred puppy or dog already in need of a home, look for a breeder. You will need to find a reputable breeder to give you the best chance of a healthy dog with a sound temperament. Problems with irresponsible breeders range from purebreds that are inbred, causing litters that suffer from illnesses and congenital diseases to others guilty of “litter stuffing” – offering puppies from another mother, to be sold under the auspices of a “Champion” to get more money.

Visit their facilities and meet their dogs. Facilities should be clean. See how their dogs behave, and if that is the behavior you want from your dog. All dogs should be healthy, clean, and free of parasites. A good breeder will screen breeding stock for common health problems before breeding and will be happy to share that information with you. Tests should be done on the stud and the bitch. When you find a breeder you want, then wait for a litter. A good breeder will require a sales agreement that clearly spells out the obligations for everyone involved.

Get a complete veterinary exam within 24 hours of picking up your puppy. Make sure you have him micro-chipped, and get an ID tag.

Make sure every member of your family is equally well trained in handling the dog. Make sure every member of your family knows that dogs can nip and bite, when they are playful. (A nip is NOT an attack!) Kids need to learn to be around a dog as much as the dog learns how to listen to commands. Make sure your family are all ready to walk the dog, feed the dog, brush the dog, and pick up after the dog.

A bred dog becomes your personal responsibility.

If sometime in the future, you have to relocate to another home or apartment, you HAVE to find an apartment or home that allows dogs. If you cannot find such a home, or make a specific agreement with your new landlord, be a loving and responsible guardian and find your dog a new home too with another family. You are his only chance at life. Don’t drop him off at the pound. Since 56% of dogs including purebreds entering shelters are euthanized, your older dog, depressed with a broken heart will easily be overlooked. Shelter descriptions are cursory, and if your dog acts slightly defensively he will be marked “fractious” and be killed. You are the most qualified person to find your dog a new home. Go to MuttShack.org and learn where to advertise, and how to promote your dog.

People moving are the cause of the death of millions of dogs yearly when they are dumped at the pound like some disposable commodity as unwanted as old garden furniture.

If you made the choice to bring a dog into this world through your breeder, you should see it through to his dying day. Society is no longer finding it acceptable to have to take in a dog when the owner’s whim has passed him by. There are many more dogs than homes. Don’t think your dog (even a purebred) will be any more special than millions of other dogs that have to be euthanized every year.

Dog Fleas

Although many species of fleas feed primarily on one type of animal, the common cat and dog flea will readily take blood from a variety of animals, including man. Flea infestations of pets and their homes will most likely involve the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis and occasionally the dog flea, C. canis.

Fleas are small (2 to 4 mm in length), brownish to black insects which are characteristically flattened from side to side. Adults are wingless and capable of jumping relatively long distances. Adults feed exclusively on blood with their piercing-sucking mouthparts. When not actively feeding, adult fleas often hide in locations frequented by the host animal such as your dog bedding, sofas, or carpeted areas.

The common cat and dog fleas breed throughout the year. After feeding and mating, the female deposits her eggs, usually on the host. Several eggs are laid daily and up to several hundred over a lifetime. Eggs normally fall off the host into bedding material or similar areas and hatch within two weeks.

Flea eggs accumulate in areas where the host spends most of its time. In addition, adult fleas defecate small pellets of digested blood which also drop off into the environment. A flea comb will often gather this fecal matter at the base of the tines providing a good sign of flea infestation. The combination of white flea eggs and black dried blood specks may appear as a sprinkling of salt and pepper where an infested animal has slept.

Fleas undergo complete metamorphosis, that is, they pass through four developmental stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Immature fleas do not resemble adults at all.

Flea larvae are tiny, light colored, and, worm-like, without legs. They feed primarily on various debris and organic material including the droppings of the adults which contains digested blood. Flea larvae occur indoors and outdoors, wherever the eggs have fallen off the host. In houses, flea larvae live in carpeting, furniture, animal bedding and other protected areas with high humidity. Flea larvae also live outdoors in areas where animals spend time such as under porches in and around dog houses, etc.

Because flea larvae depend on the adult’s fecal pellets of dried blood as a food source, they cannot live in lawns or other outdoor areas unless the pet visits those areas enough to provide this food.

Depending on the species of flea and environmental conditions the larvae will pupate in one week to several months. The pupa is contained within a loose silken cocoon which is often covered by bits of debris. Under average conditions, the life cycle of the flea normally requires between 30 and 75 days but may take much longer. Adult fleas inside the cocoon, called pre-emerged fleas, will stay in that condition for weeks to months if no external cues from a host is available.

However, when disturbed by the presence of a host such as vibrations or carbon dioxide from exhaled breath, the fleas emerge simultaneously and attack the host. This is why it is possible to return to a house or apartment that has been empty for months and find it full of fleas.

When the normal host is available, fleas may feed several times a day but they are capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. In household situations, the normal host is a cat or dog. However, if the normal host is removed, starved fleas will readily seek other sources of blood and more often than not, man is the alternate host. In severe infestations, fleas will attack humans even though the normal host is present.

Certain species of fleas have been known to transmit such diseases as bubonic plague and murine typhus. These have never been a major problem. The major problems with fleas is as a nuisance pest of pets. The irritation and itching from flea bites results in scratching and potential secondary infection. Fleas may also transmit the double-pored dog tapeworm to dogs and cats.

Finally, persistent attacks from fleas can cause severe allergic responses in some people and pets. Once sensitized, a single flea bite may produce symptoms including hair loss, usually around the base of the tail, dermatitis, and intense itching. In worse cases, puppies and young kittens can also died from serious fleas infestations.

With proper flea management knowledge, flea problems will not be a big issue and can be battle and win over easily.

Treating Dog Arthritis

Osteoarthritis in dogs (or just dog arthritis) can be treated effectively with natural supplements that are as effective as commonly prescribed drugs and much safer because of the less risk of side effects. Prescribed drugs may relieve pain, but they also can cause further degeneration of your dog’s joints and health, which could include, damage to the liver, kidneys, muscles and gastrointestinal bleeding, among others.

Just as human arthritis, dog arthritis tends to get worse with age, and you can find some senior dog food formulas that claim to contain glucosamine and chondroitin, both of them are supplements used to prevent and treat dog arthritis, but in the majority of cases, the amount included is not enough to do any difference in your dog’s symptoms. So, probably the best option is to feed your dog regular dog food and back that up with a supplement. Below you will find some of the most effective supplement used for the treatment of arthritis in dogs.

Herbal Glucosamine Blend, which is one of the most comprehensive canine muscle and joint support formulations available today, it includes Glucosamine HCl, MSM and Vitamins B1, B2, B6 and C, along with a proprietary herbal blend of Yucca, Devil’s Claw, White Willow, Meadowsweet and Alfalfa.

Glucosamine is essential for the formation of joint cartilage and synovial fluid, MSM, has an anti-inflammatory effect slows the progression of arthritis and relieves pain.

Alfalfa and Yucca extract, a combination of five time-honored herbs for chronic rheumatic conditions it also includes Burdock, Licorice, and Shepherd’s Purse. This extract is designed to help the body cope with the pain, swelling, and stiffness of arthritis and rheumatism while maintains the tone of the liver and kidneys to help eliminate excess waste materials and water from the joints.

Ortho-Flex Joint Ease Supplement for dogs this formula is a supplement for muscle, ligament, tendon, cartilage, and bone problems. It does not only to help in the relief of pain, but to also treat the underlying problem. It really helps older animals. This formula contains Chondroitin Sulfate, which is used to help dogs with joint conditions and arthritis.

The benefits of using natural, organic pet products are in the preventive measure, you want a healthy pet with a longer lifespan, but also an enhanced quality of life, there’s no use on living longer if the quality of life is not good, holistic pet care, will provide a better quality of life for your pet and ultimately will save you money with less visits to the veterinarian, bills and prescriptions.

Finding a Reputable Dog Breeder

  • Who is the breeder? It is very important to find out who the breeder is. One way to find out, is checking references. If the breeder is unable to provide written references, you should move on. Snoop around a bit. Talk to other breeders, rescue groups, veterinarians, anyone who can give you some information.
  • Does the breeder require a Spay/neuter contract and limited registration? This means that you are legally obligated to promise that you will NOT attempt to breed your new dog. This helps stop poor quality breeding, and insure high standards of the breed.
  • A reputable breeder should provide you with a “health check” which tests the lineage for known and testable genetic disorders. The breeder should be familiar with the health line of several generations. As a result, he/she should provide you with a health guarantee for a certain time period.
  • A reputable breeder should encourage you to select a puppy with the temperament and personality that is compatible with you and your family. Do not let the breeder convince you that “this” one is for you. A good breeder will only produce litters AFTER they have buyers.
  • The breeder should be honest about the dogs’ characteristics. They should tell you both the good points and the bad points concerning a breed. Different breeds of dogs have unique characteristics that are traditional in their breed. So it is important you educate yourself.
  • Check out the facilities. Make sure the breeder is keeping the dogs in a clean healthy environment. Ask to see where the dogs are kept. If the breeder insists on only bringing the dogs to you, stay clear!!
  • Is your breeder involved in the breed? Most often you will find that a good breeder is involved in either, showing, performance, local clubs or rescue. An active breeder is a good sign that he/she truly cares about the breed

Greyhound Adoption

Throughout the US and in many parts of the world, greyhounds are used as racing dogs to support gambling. In the United States alone, there are roughly 40 dog tracks and hundreds of puppy farms and training facilities around the country. Years ago, the greyhound industry was in much worse shape than it is today. Many tracks have established very good policies as well as “no kill” rules that help ensure the health and fate of the greyhounds. However, there are still thousands of greyhounds that after their racing days are in need of forever homes.

Soon after greyhounds are born, they are sent to farms for training. They often remain in these training facilities until they are 18 months old. At this age, the dogs are introduced to the track and if they’re fast enough, will often race until they are between 3-4 years old. Aft this, they are usually put up for adoption.

It’s not enough to consider adopting a greyhound for humanitarian reasons alone. Think about the breed’s characteristics to determine if it would be a good fit in your home. Greyhounds are very easy-going dogs. This might surprise you, since we’re used to seeing greyhounds speeding around racing tracks reaching speeds of 40 mph. Despite this, greyhounds are normally good for only a few sprints per day. Otherwise, they are truly happy to relax around the house and casually play with a toy or a companion. The greyhound’s docile personality is complemented by their loyalty, intelligence and excitement about simple things like taking nightly walks or seeing their owner return home from work.

Greyhound come in a variety of colors including solid blue, white, black, red, fawn and combinations of these colors with spotted and brindle patterns. Male greyhounds generally weigh between 65-75 pounds and females tend to weigh between 55-65 pounds. Their sleek, athletic look should be maintained even as they enter retirement. Keeping a greyhound fit and trim should be relatively easy since their metabolism is quite fast and they don’t tend to gain weight easily. Perhaps in part because of their great conditioning, greyhounds have long life expectancies for such large dogs, spanning between 12-15 years.

Greyhounds are available at shelters around the country – many of which are associated with local racing tracks. Be sure to discuss your home situation with the director of the adoption facility. They’ll want to know if you have cats at home, small dogs and very young children. Based on greyhounds’ training and instinct, some maintain left over aggressiveness toward small animals. The facility’s adoption director should be able to suggest a number of greyhounds that match well to your home life.