Bearded Dragon Facts

The genus originates from the sub family Agaminae and is from the family called Agamidae. They are naturally cold blooded being reptiles. They posses spiny scales all around their bodies. Whenever they may feel they are being threatened they are able to expand out their spiny scales around the throat to show their aggression. The also can move around their head in an up and down motion to show dominance amongst males.

There are many color combinations. A lot of times they are dark golden brown and also can come in tan and brown. Occasionally they also have black markings. They have the ability to change their color on their scales during a rivalry or when the temperatures rise or drop. Fully grown they are around thirteen to twenty-four inches long on average.

People usually keep them as pets. One of the most common varieties is the Pogona viticeps or more commonly known as the Central Inland Bearded Dragons. Pogona is also a term that can cover other species too. They are quite popular pets because of how easy it is to maintain and care for them as well as their calm nature. They are probably one of the most popular lizards kept among reptile pets. They can be quite interesting. They are happy when they have a properly maintained enclosure to live and play in and make wonderful pets.

They are naturally omnivorous and they consume both plants and animals. When in the wild they eat a large variety of foods. Ones kept as pets most of the time eat green leafy vegetables as well as insects coated with a powder supplement. Crickets are a very common and popular choice for them. They can also consume flies, butter worms, silk worms and one their favorites super worms.

Some popular choices in green leafy vegetables include collard greens, parsley, carrot tops, and turnips. Some orange colored vegetables can also be eaten including squash, carrots, pumpkins, and beets. Other favorites include celery, rosemary, basil, hibiscus, rose petals and oregano. They need a bit of variety in their diets but they are very easy to keep healthy and happy.

Fruits including apples, pears, strawberries, grapes, melons, mangoes and papayas are good too. Owners are discouraged from feeding wild insects because it exposes them to viruses and parasites among other dangers. Some bugs including fire flies contain a fatal ingredient known as bioluminescent chemicals which can kill lizards when consumed. Depending on their environment and health level they easily can live about five to ten years on average inside captivity.

For additional information about bearded dragon facts you can quickly find out more online. Also pet stores have great information on the topic you may want to check out. There are so many different sources you can find on this topic. They usually make great pets and do not grow very big. They usually are friendly and easy to handle even for children since they are tame.

Parrot Health

  • Conjunctivitis – Is caused by a bacterial infection in the lungs associated with environmental factors (dust, drafty housing, and irritating fumes), nutritional deficiencies (vitamin A is often cited, although no specific experimental evidence support this view) or trauma and can be associated to ulcerative keratitis. Conjunctivitis is fairly easy to notice with a crusting of the eyes normally accompanied by red a swollen tissue beginning at the eye lid. An avian vet would diagnose and would normally treat this condition using antibiotics.
  • Avian Pox – A viral infection often having similar symptoms of Conjunctivitis although it is common to be accompanied by swollen, blistering formations on the eye lid.
  • Marek’s Disease – Is in a group of herpes viruses and most deadly although a vaccine (Zovirax, normally used for chicken pox in Humans)can be helpful to eliminate the spread of Marek’s disease it is usually too late to save the infected bird. There are 4 types of Marek’s (Cutaneous (skin form), Neural (nerve form),Visceral (internal-organ form),and the Ocular (Eye form). The Visceral (internal Organ Form) type is most commonly found in chickens, but can spread very quickly to other birds(Parrots). This Disease is normally spread through dander and close contact.
  • Uveitis – Is the inflammation of the eye and can be an indicator of much more serious internal problems. Trauma, penetrating injury, systemic disease, autoimmune condition, and mycosis, bacterial or viral disorders are causes of uveitis in birds.
  • Cataracts -Several causes for cataracts including poor diet (low vitamin e) this has also been associated with long term exposure to artificial light, senescence, trauma, developmental abnormalities, genetic disorders, nutritional deficiency, radiation, UV radiation and inflammatory factors. The good news is an operation to remove the cataracts known as Lensectomy by needle discision and aspiration, and conventional extra capsular extraction or ultrasonic phacoemulsification can be successful in birds.
  • Glaucoma – Glaucoma has rarely been reported in birds. Identification of glaucoma in most bird species is problematic because of the small size of their eyes, making even the use of testing equipment with small tips difficult or impossible when glaucoma is found, it is usually due to trauma and resulting iatrogenic associated with cataract surgery
  • Corneal degeneration – In pet birds, crystal deposition in the corneal stoma is reported as the second most frequent ocular disorder in pet birds.

Protecting Garden Birds From Magpies

First up, a very simple a cheap system for deterring magpies from your garden. Oddly enough, these socially advanced creatures absolutely cannot abide being looked at by other animals, particularly those they can’t identify. In Australia the birds have been known to attack children in the street, who then took to strapping paper eyes to the reverse of their caps. The magpies see the false eyes, spook easily and are quick to back away.

This is an easy method to adopt, and there are a few ways to expand upon it to make it even more effective. Start off by making a few sets of paper eyes at home. Once you’ve got a few pairs start posting them up around the garden. Trunks and walls are best, a nice flat surface where they’ll enjoy a lot of visibility. Fasten them on with sellotape for longer-lasting results.

The tape actually plays into the best way to improve the technique. Magpies are more likely to spook from objects which reflect light well. Not only are they bright, but they better represent the glistening effect of an actual eye. The best value for money solution you’ll find requires two types of object. A thread of string and any loose CDs and DVDs you’ve no intention of keeping. String the CDs together into long hanging ornaments, then affix them to walls, trunks and branches. They’ll turn in the wind, reflecting randomly while also resembling a circular eye, complete with pupil.

In small domestic gardens these techniques will prove successful enough at scaring off the pesky, predatory birds. So long as you maintain good lines of sight so a pair of eyes or reflective CDs are constantly in view the magpie population should quickly begin avoiding your property. In larger areas setting up a large number of these items tends to be an inefficient use of your time. Instead consider a scarecrow with reflective eyes. They’re an old standby, and the appearance of a conscious human does wonders deterring these birds.

Care For A Baby Pygmy Goat

For sleeping, a baby pygmy goat must have a place that is free from any draft. A basic shed big enough to fit all your goats in will be suitable for this. There should be approximately fifteen to twenty square feet between each animal. Their bedding should be made out of sawdust or straw. This should always be kept clean and dry. If it has been manured or wet, then this should be cleaned out at least once every day. The flooring should consist of clay over gravel. This means that everything will drain well and will not smell or rot.

A baby pygmy goat should be fed with colostrum. This is its mothers milk. It should be fed the colostrum as soon as practically possible once it has been born. This gives the baby the correct antibodies and nutrition it needs to help it to live within its early stages of life. Fresh colostrum is what is recommended. However, powdered colostrum can also be used if necessary.

In terms of food, these goats should be fed according to what their ages are. If a baby is under ten days old, then it will have to have its milk approximately four times each day. From ten days through to eight weeks old, they will require three bottles each day. After this age, it will go down to two bottles of milk every day right through until the weaning process has been completed. By then, the goat should be three months of age. A baby’s bottle is all that is required to feed your baby goat.

Once your goat has reached three weeks of age, they should now be ready for solid food. A small amount of gray and some hay will encourage it to keep on weaning. Weaning is a process that can take some time. As the goat continues to get older, you can introduce more solid food to what it is already having.

Fresh water must always be available for your baby pygmy goat. Especially when it begins to eat solid food.

A fenced off area should also be provided. This allows your goat to graze and play in this area. These kind of goats enjoy jumping from small niches. Small ramps and houses make great items for your goats to jump on or in. Especially if their pasture is not very nice or interesting.

The hooves of your baby pygmy goat should be trimmed every couple of months. You can do this with a small hand pruner.