Training Parrot

This will include both time and patience to correctly train your bird. by taking your time and being patient you will create a bond with your parrot that will last a lifetime.

By following a few very easy steps you can easily start the training for your bird. First thing is when you start your training session always take the bird out of the cage and find a small quiet area away from the cage. This will make it much easier for your parrot to stay focused and devoted to the task at hand.

The next step is to eliminate all distractions in the training area. Distractions in the training area will cause your parrot to get sidetracked and will result in a poor learning session. make sure you turn off the stereo,cell phone and TV.

Remember this, Parrots are like raising your young children. Training sessions should be small periods of time, Parrots have very small attention spans so take your time and always be patient.

Another thing to remember choose your session time around the bird’s daily schedule. One of the best times to start a training session Is right after a meal, Your bird will be content and pay attention to what you are teaching. Always compliment your parrot, The more the better. Parrots really appreciate being complimented.

OK now this is very important, In the beginning of your training if it does not seem to be working at a level you wish it was. Never let your parrot see your stress level If you get mad and show your stress level to your bird, This will cause a undesirable encounter for the parrot which will in return cause a focus and learning problem in future training sessions.

Now its time to teach your bird a new trick. If you use a treat to compliment the trick your bird will remember this and start to work for the treat. Another thing you should always remember is: Not just birds but all animals respond to training session better to compliment compared to punishment or yelling at them. Always avoid yelling or punishing your bird even when they are performing a trick wrong.

Ignoring bad conduct is always the best thing to do when in a training session with your bird. Parrots do not understand a unfavorable offer or punishment. So this being said understand that if you decide to respond to your parrots bad behavior this may in fact be taken into view from the bird as constructive attention. This in return will cause undesirable conclusions to the training sessions.

Also remember your parrot will always love food and treats for compliments, but always try to praise worthy conduct and promote play around time. otherwise, you will have a problem getting your bird to perform or participate in training tricks when a snack or treat is not offered.

Repeating the tricks over and over again is very important to being successful in the training of your pet. The more you repeat the better your parrot will get. Just keep repeating these training steps over and over, And in time your parrot will learn the tricks and it will get easier for your bird to complete the trick. This general instructions concept will work for easy tricks as well as advanced talents.

For instance start out with a easy trick like having your parrot sit on your finger on demand. Use only 1 Keyword for each trick, And use the keyword every time you practice the trick. Remember never force or push your bird to train. If your bird seems to be tired or uninterested in training, Immediately stop the session and start the training session at a later time.

As time goes on and your parrot starts to learn tricks and commands you can start moving the training area closer to the bird’s cage. As the confidence builds in your parrots unique skill they will begin to perform more and more in the household as well as there own bird cage.

Parrots learn amazingly fast in almost all cases. Not only by repeating training sessions but by just listening to sounds around them. So be careful what you repeat around them because chances are you will hear your own words sometime in the near future.

Just remember a few important things training a parrot requires a lot of patience and time. To make the partnership worthwhile you have to exchange love and take the time to understand your bird. With love training and proper care you can and will end up with a well trained bird and friendship that will last a lifetime.

Dog Ear Infections: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention

  • As many as 20 percent of dogs have some form of ear disease
  • Dogs are more prone to ear infections than humans because of the shape of their ear canals
  • Prevention is key — learn how to clean your dog’s ears safely
  • If your dog is showing any of the common signs of ear infections, it’s important to visit your veterinarian as soon as possible

Purchase a safe ear-cleaning solution for your dog

Many dog owners have learned to recognize the telltale signs of an ear infection: whining, scratching, and head shaking are often the first symptoms of the problem.

Ear infections are common conditions in dogs, especially those with floppy ears such as Basset Hounds and Cocker Spaniels. An estimated 20 percent of dogs have some form of ear disease, which may affect one or both ears. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to reduce the length and severity of these episodes for your dog.

There are three types of ear infections, known formally as otitis externa, media, and interna. The most common is otitis externa, in which inflammation affects the layer of cells lining the external portion of the ear canal. Otitis media and Interna refer to infections of the middle and inner ear canal, respectively. These infections often result from the spread of infection from the external ear. Otitis media and interna can be very serious and may result in deafness, facial paralysis, and vestibular signs. That’s why it’s important to prevent infections and seek early treatment when problems arise.

Symptoms of Dog Ear Infections

Some dogs show no symptoms of ear infection aside from a buildup of wax and discharge in the ear canal. But ear infections often cause significant discomfort and affected dogs may show signs such as:

  • Head shaking
  • Scratching at the affected ear
  • Dark discharge
  • Odor
  • Redness and swelling of the ear canal
  • Pain
  • Itchiness
  • Crusting or scabs in the ears

What Causes Ear Infections in Dogs?

The canine ear canal is more vertical than that of a human, forming an L-shape that tends to hold in fluid. This makes dogs more prone to ear infections. Ear infections are typically caused by bacteria, yeast, or a combination of both. In puppies, ear mites can also be a source of infection.

Factors that may predispose your dog to ear infections include:

  • Moisture, which can create a prime growing environment for bacteria and yeast
  • Allergies, which lead to ear disease in about 50 percent of dogs with allergic skin disease and 80 percent of dogs with food sensitivities
  • Endocrine disorders, such as thyroid disease
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Wax buildup
  • Foreign bodies
  • Injury to the ear canal
  • Excessive cleaning

Precise Diagnosis Needed for a Dog’s Ear Infections

If your dog is showing any of the common signs of ear infections, it’s important to visit your veterinarian as soon as possible. Quick treatment is necessary not only for your dog’s comfort (these conditions can be painful!), but also to prevent the spread of infection to the middle and inner ear. Do not try to treat ear problems at home.

Be prepared to provide your vet with a thorough history of the problem. This is especially important for first-time infections, or if you are seeing a new veterinarian. Your vet will want to know the following:

  • Duration of any symptoms, such as pain, swelling, discharge, and odor
  • If your dog has any allergies or other underlying medical conditions
  • If your dog is on medication
  • What your dog has been eating
  • How often you clean your dog’s ears and which products you use
  • If you’ve trimmed or plucked the hair in your dog’s ears
  • Recent activities, such as baths, grooming, or swimming
  • If your dog has a history of ear infections, when they occurred, and how they were treated

After obtaining your dog’s history, your veterinarian will perform a physical examination. In severe cases, your vet may also recommend sedating your dog to facilitate examination deep within the ear canal. Your vet will evaluate both ears, and the exam may include:

  • Visual assessment to look for signs such as redness, swelling, and discharge
  • Examination with an otoscope, which allows evaluation of the ear canal and eardrum
  • Gentle palpation of the ear to assess level of pain
  • Microscopic examination of samples taken by swabbing the ear
  • Culture of samples from the ear
  • Biopsies or X-rays in severe or chronic cases

How are Dog Ear Infections Treated?

Your veterinarian will thoroughly clean your dog’s ears using a medicated cleaner. Your vet may also prescribe a cleaner and a topical medication for you to use at home. In severe cases, your vet may prescribe oral antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications.

Most uncomplicated ear infections resolve within 1–2 weeks, once appropriate treatment begins. But severe infections or those due to underlying conditions may take months to resolve or may become chronic problems. In cases of severe chronic disease where other treatments have failed, your veterinarian may recommend surgery such as a Total Ear Canal Ablation (TECA). A TECA surgery removes the ear canal, thus removing the diseased tissue and preventing the recurrence of infection.

It is important to follow your veterinarian’s instructions closely and return to the veterinary hospital for any recommended recheck appointments. Lapses in your dog’s treatment may lead to the recurrence of the infection. It is especially important that you finish the full course of your dog’s medication, even if your dog appears to be getting better. Failure to finish the full course of treatment may lead to additional problems such as resistant infections.

Can You Prevent Ear Infections in Dogs?

As with most diseases, prevention is always best. Excess moisture is a common cause of ear infections, so be sure to thoroughly dry your dog’s ears after swimming and bathing. If your dog is prone to chronic or recurrent ear infections, identifying and managing any underlying causes such as allergies can help prevent new infections from occurring.

Cleaning your dog’s ears at home can also help prevent ear infections. Jeff Grognet, DVM, a columnist for AKC Family Dog, advises the following steps for ear cleaning: “First, fill the canal with a cleaning solution and massage the vertical ear canal from the outside. Wipe out the canal with absorbent gauze. Don’t use paper towels or cotton because these may leave fibers behind, and those could cause irritation.” Cotton swabs may also be useful for cleaning your dog’s pinnae (the external ear flaps) but avoid using them in the ear canal, which may inadvertently push debris deeper into the canal.

Ear infections are a common and often recurrent problem in many dogs, but, with your veterinarian’s help, you can keep your dog’s ears clean and comfortable. If your dog is showing signs of an ear infection, seek treatment right away to ensure the problem does not become serious.

Caring for Baby Iguanas

In order to begin caring for the babies, you have to ensure that they are born into a healthy environment. If you have a female iguana that is about to lay eggs, this section applies to you. Ensure that your mother iguana has a safe, clean and quiet place to lay her eggs. The female iguana likes to bury her eggs, so fill the enclosure or cage with soft dirt for the burial. If you suspect that one of the female iguana’s eggs has gotten “stuck” inside her reproductive system, you may need to take the mother iguana to the veterinarian for x-rays. Once the mother has laid and buried her eggs, she will be very defensive of them, so keep this in mind when tending to the enclosure. When the time comes, the eggs will hatch, and the baby iguanas will be born. Do not force them to come out and do not disturb them while they are in the process of being born.

It is important that babies live in the right kind of shelter. Make sure that the cage has artificial turf or some kind of carpeting to help keep the temperature warm. You can also use newspapers to line the cage if you cannot obtain artificial turf. The cage should also have a heating lamp or some kind of heater, especially if the nights are cold. Put a thermometer inside the cage so you can monitor the temperature. The ideal temperature for the cage should be 70 degrees Fahrenheit at night and 85 degrees Fahrenheit during the day. Last but not least, place some branches or something for the iguana to climb on.

A baby iguana’s diet is also very important. Their diet should consist of food that contains Vitamin D3, phosphorus and calcium. Leafy greens should be a part of their diet. You can also feed the iguana the kinds of fruits and vegetables you eat on a regular basis, such as the aforementioned leafy greens like lettuce and berries. They have a delicate digestive system, so you cannot just feed them anything. Stick to the vegetables and fruit mentioned and they should be fine. Also ensure that they have plenty of clean water. You can also try going to your local pet store for specialized iguana food.

About Box Turtle Pet Care

HOUSING

Box turtles need a big size enclosure in order to provide for the proper range of heating and humidity.

The smallest size indoor housing for one box turtle to be kept in is 3 x 3 x 2 feet. For two turtles, the minimum size should be at least 4 x 4 x 2 feet. Aquariums are not appropriate housing for an adult box turtle. Babies may be kept in aquariums, but as they grow larger enclosures are needed.

Create a land area using 2 to 3 inches of good quality plain sterile potting soil slightly moistened. Do not use backyard dirt of soil from a garden.. Do not used coarse substrates such are gravel or sand, as these tend to scratch the shell and open the way for bacterial infections.

Box turtles require a hide box in which to get away from it all and feel secure. A good size box in one corner of the enclosure, filled with hay in which to burrow. is essential. The hide box can be anything from a cardboard box to a plastic container with a door cut into it.

A water area must be provided with its deep enough that the water comes to just about the nose of the turtle. It doesn’t need to be able to swim, just to soak. If using a kitty litter pan, it is best to sink this into the substrate and provide a ramp to get in and get out for the turtle.

The water area must be kept clean at all times. Box turtles not only use the water to soak in but also relieve themselves in.

LIGHTING

Full spectrum lighting is required for indoor enclosures. Full spectrum light mimics the beneficial effects of natural sunlight, enabling the turtle to metabolize vitamin D3. The full spectrum lighting is an essential part of the calcium metallization process. Without the specific wavelengths and proper diet, calcium deficiencies will result which may ultimately prove fatal. Box Turtles need 12 to 14 hours of light each day. NOTE: UV waves cannot pass through glass, and 40% of the available waves are lost when the light passes through an aluminum screen, try to have the light shining directly on them.

HUMIDITY/TEMPERATURE

Day Time temps: 85 to 88 degrees

Night Time temps: 70 to 75 degrees.

Most box turtles require a relative humidity of 60 to 80% in at least one area of their enclosure. Turtle that are not provided with the correct humidity often suffer from infected and swollen eyes and ear infections. Providing humidity is simple, in one corner of the enclosure provide some peat moss and wet it down with water until it is fairly moist. A hiding area, such as a cardboard box or large plastic container with ventilation holes should be placed over the wet peat moss. Be sure to check the moss constantly to ensure it is moist and has not dried out.

HIBERNATION

It is a good idea to allow your box turtle to hibernate, especially if you keep it in an outdoor enclosure during the summer months.This is to allow the box turtles internal clock to remain normal. If you choose not to hibernate the turtle, you must keep it warm and provide plenty of UV lighting along with their normal dietary needs.

To prepare a box turtle for hibernation, do not feed the animal for two weeks, but keep the heat on to allow the animal to fully digest any food remaining in its stomach and intestinal tract. Soak the box turtle in a shallow container of lukewarm water a few times during this period for about 10 minutes, this will help to hydrate the animal and to remove any food left in their system. Box turtle that hibernate with food still present in their intestinal tract can die from massive infections as the food rots inside them.

Hibernating box turtles indoor requires a hibernation box. A cardboard box half filled with moist sterile potting soil or peat moss with holes punched in the sides for aeration is an appropriate hibernation box. After all the food has been cleared from the turtle’s system, introduce the turtle to the hibernation box. If the box turtle buries down into the substrate and remains still, it is ready for hibernation. If the animal is moving restlessly around after 20 minutes in the box, return if to its enclosure, wait a few days and try again. If the box turtle is ready, move it to an unheated room, such as a garage, where the temperature will remain between 40 to 55 degrees. Check the box turtle weekly to make sure is has not surfaced prematurely. Box turtles usually come out of hibernation after experiencing temperature above 65 degrees for a few days. After the turtle comes out of hibernation, return it to its regular enclosure, provide water, warm it up for a couple of days, and then offer some food. Pay close attention to the turtle during the time after hibernation to observe for any health problems that may occur.

DIET

It is best to offer food after the turtle has had a few hours to warm up in the morning. Young turtle require feeding on a daily basis, while adult can be fed every other day. Make sure you combine their diet with both plant and animal matter. Vitamin supplements should be added twice a week.

Plants: A variety of vegetables, greens and fruits are a must. Such as a “salad” of carrots, squash green beans, strawberries, cranberries, blackberries, cherries, and plums. Some cantaloupe (with the rind), mustard greens, dandelions, and collard greens can also be mixed in. For treats you can add flowers like hibiscus, rose petals, and geraniums.

Meat: High quality low-fat canned dog food, finely chopped cooked chicken or raw beef heart. Live food can also be offered, like meal worms and crickets.

Find The Right Vet For Your Pet Bunny Rabbit

Finding the right Vet

Waiting until you have an emergency on your hands to find a vet is never a good idea. For one thing, you’ll wind up racing around trying to find just anyone who can help you, and you may end up with a mediocre vet or one who overcharges you. For another thing, many vets don’t have much experience with pet rabbits, and it is in your pet’s best interest to find a vet who knows a great deal about rabbits.

So find a good vet now, before you even need one. You’ll be putting yourself in a much better position should your pet require emergency care down the line. Moreover, having a vet will make you much more likely to take your rabbit for regular checkups and important procedures like spaying/neutering and clipping or teeth-trimming.

Choosing the Right Vet

It can be next to impossible to find a good vet simply by scrolling through names in a phonebook or even just looking online. You should visit offices, check out the environment, ask others in the office what the vet is like, and so on.

Talk to the vet him- or herself. Ask him how familiar he is with rabbits?how many rabbits does he see per month? Does he have training with regard to rabbits? Does he know the common health concerns that rabbit pet-owners have to worry about? Can he give you advice on rabbit diets? What about clipping and teeth-trimming? Will he be able to help you with that?

This kind of in-person research is the best way to ensure that you select a vet who is knowledgeable, has a good reputation, has a clear office environment, and has experience with pet rabbits in particular.